FAQs

  • Lansing Building Products FAQS
  • Credit FAQS
  • Vinyl Siding FAQS
  • Window FAQS
  • You describe Lansing Building Products as Independent Building Products Distributor. Can you define what that means? An Independent Building Products Distributor, such as LBP, is not owned by a manufacturer. As a result, we are able to select the best products and services for your needs. It is commonly understood that each market area is unique, commanding a need to provide a product mix that reflects the specific product demands for that market. An independent distributor, such as LBP, represents top brands from multiple manufacturers and is positioned with more choices and alternatives than a single brand, manufacturer owned warehouse.back to top
  • How is Lansing Building Products different from other building products distributors? Lansing Building Products has been in business for over 50 years and has 65 branches throughout the United States. We offer only quality products, including the brands you trust. We offer comprehensive, professional, marketing services to help grow your business. LBP offer services that make your daily operations more efficient like free dumpster service, next day delivery, a large inventory of products, and a commitment to you, the customer. back to top
  • How do I find out more about your marketing services? You can check out our marketing programs on this website. If you are interested in discovering how this can impact your business, contact your local LBP Representative or the LBP Marketing Department.back to top
  • How can I demonstrate the difference between lower grade products and those that are offered by Lansing Building Products? Products represented by Lansing Building Products such as Mastic Home Exteriors, Simonton, Provia, James Hardie, Royal, Therma Tru, Timbertech, and many other products have all passed the stringent requirements necessary to be certified as a LBP product. We have also established a special family of Lansing Building Products that are considered to be among the highest valued products available on the market.back to top
  • Training has become a big issue in my company, how can Lansing Building Products help? Lansing Building Products takes training seriously, both internal and external. We train our associates to understand not only the products that we represent, but also how they apply to your business. We train our customers in a number of different formats and will provide on-site training for your staff in the use of new sale demonstration tools. LBP also prides itself in providing expert advice and information available to you at the touch of a phone. We have shown a commitment in carrying quality products, a commitment to inventory, competitive pricing and to great service.back to top
  • What do you have that separates you from your competition? First of all, we believe it is our people. LBP takes great pride in selecting the finest candidates available on the market. We then commit to many hours of training in products, the industry and our technical operations. Customer Service is the major difference between LBP and its competitors.back to top
  • What can you do to help me make to grow my business? One of the biggest competitive service differences is our LBP Marketing Department. It is committed to partnering with our customers to develop a marketing strategy that is customized for their business. Also by offering the best products and having a large inventory available you can feel confident that you have what your customers want. Our branch representatives are committed to partnering with you to making your business a success.back to top
  • What are our business hours? Since we are located across the United States the individual branch sets it business hours. We suggest you call your local branch about their business hours. You can find the phone number on the website under “Locations”. The corporate office and branches are closed on Saturdays and Sundays.back to top
  • How do I establish credit with Lansing Building Products? Contact your local branch to get an application. A LBP application is simple to fill out, in many cases taking less than 5 minutes! Our associates will be happy to answer any questions that you may have.back to top
  • Does LBP have a finance program that I can offer homeowners? Lansing Building Products offers a financing program, Lansing Green, to qualified contractors that they can offer to homeowners. For more information contact your local Branch Manager or go to the ‘Lansing Green’ section on our website. back to top
  • Can I buy a gutter machine on credit? LBP has partnered with First Pacific Funding to offer credit for gutter machine purchases. To apply for credit with First Pacific Funding contact your local LBP Branch Manager or on LBP’s website in the ‘Gutter’ section. back to top
  • In choosing an exterior siding product, how does vinyl siding compare with other products? Vinyl is a durable choice that offers a variety of styles and colors. If produced by quality manufacturer, it will provide up to a lifetime of maintenance free service.back to top
  • Is there a difference in vinyl products? Due to the fact that vinyl is a chemical composition, there is a definite difference between manufactured products. Quality vinyl contains a high level of impact modifiers and special weathering chemicals such as titanium dioxide and geloy to guard against the elements. This is the case regardless of the product, siding or windows.back to top
  • Considering the exterior choices available, are there other materials other than vinyl? Alternative materials such as brick, stucco, fiber cement and wood may provide the particular architectural style you are seeking. LBP offers other quality exterior products beside vinyl siding.back to top
  • Does vinyl siding add resale value to a home? With the addition of vinyl siding, your home will retain its original, like new look throughout its life. This, along with providing a maintenance free solution to potential buyers, will ensure the highest resale value possible.back to top
  • How can I compete with low cost vinyl window products? A cheap vinyl window has potential devastating effect to a home and to the buyer. Most of these products are made with inferior vinyl compositions mixed from recycled vinyl. The working parts tend to be of low quality, lasting just a few years before breaking. This can lead to water damage, air infiltration and potential warranty violations. The best way to compete is to educate yourself on the important features and benefits of your product. If you invest the time in demonstrating these features and benefits, along with your method of installation, to the potential buyer you will close more sales. Lansing Building Products is committed to providing you both the product training and the closing tools necessary to negate the effects of a lower priced competitor.back to top
  • Is there maintenance associated with vinyl siding? Other than power washing your home to keep the dirt of it, there is no painting, staining, or any other up keep associated with vinyl siding.back to top
  • How is vinyl siding fastened to the wall? Vinyl siding is fastened to the wall with nails driven through the nail hem and is then locked into place in the panel below it. back to top
  • What about scratches and nicks on the siding? Nicks and scratches are not visible because vinyl siding is color through.back to top
  • I have seen vinyl siding that looks unsightly and cheap. Why is that? “Builders Grade” vinyl siding is thin and therefore more susceptible to expansion and contraction. Additionally, when vinyl siding is not installed to industry standards, waviness and seams become visible.back to top
  • What is a U-factor? The U-factor is a measure of heat flow or conductivity through a material, the reciprocal of R-value. Although R-values are used as for measures of the resistance to heat flow for individual building materials, U-factor is always used to measure the conductive energy of building enclosures.back to top
  • What is a Design Pressure Rating? Design pressure, or also referred to as DP, expresses a numerical value that defines the structural wind loading requirements (in pounds per square foot) for a building and the components and cladding of a building. For windows and patio doors, the higher the DP rating indicates better performance under wind load (e.g.: a DP-50 window is structurally sounder than a window rated DP-35). Coastal regions often require higher DP ratings by code to anticipate higher wind velocities that can be encountered in proximity to the coast line.back to top
  • What is meant by “Solar Heat Gain Coefficient” (or, sometimes expressed as “SHGC”)? The number to know when selecting windows and patio doors – it measures how much of the sun’s heat is transmitted through these fixtures, expressed in a number from zero to one. A window that has a SHGC of .30 will allow 30 percent of the sun’s heat to pass through. Whether you want a higher or lower number will depend on your goal. Especially in the South, you will be primarily interested in a window or patio door with a low SHGC that will help to block solar heat gain inside your home, thus reducing cooling loads in hot weather.  Northern climates often look for higher SHGC performance to harness passive solar warmth on cold, sunny winter days.back to top
  • What is insulated glass? Insulated glass consists of two pieces of glass hermetically sealed to a spacer. This creates a sealed, insulated air space between the two pieces of glass, resulting in better thermal insulation performance. Insulated glass also helps reduce condensation while keeping the heat in during the winter, and heat out during the summer.back to top
  • What is low-E glass? Low-E stands for low-emissivity glass – this is a nearly invisible coating on the glass surface that are microscopically thin metallic oxide layers primarily to reduce the U-factor by suppressing radiative heat flow. The principal mechanism of heat transfer in multilayer glazing is thermal radiation from a warm pane of glass to a cooler pane. Coating a glass surface with a low-emittance material and facing that coating into the gap between the glass layers blocks a significant amount of this radiant heat transfer, thus lowering the total heat flow through the window. Low-E coatings are nearly transparent to visible light. Our primary glass supplier, Cardinal Glass, offers informative details on their website: www.cardinalcorp.comback to top
  • What is argon gas? How does it work? Added inside an insulated glass unit air space, argon gas is an invisible, insulating gas with lower thermal conductivity than atmospheric air. During the manufacturing process, the atmospheric air is displaced when argon gas is pumped into the glass unit airspace. When combined with Low-E glass the Low-E glass helps reflect heat away, while the argon gas helps reduce thermal transfer to enhance the glass unit insulating performance.back to top
  • How should I evaluate the energy performance of a window or patio door? Look for the National Fenestration Ratings Council (NFRC) label on the window or patio door. This label shows the U-Value, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient, and Visible Light Transmittance values. All values are backed by independent lab test reports on file with every window and door manufacturer. back to top
  • What about window condensation? Condensation is a direct result of interior humidity and the difference between indoor and outdoor air temperature. If you keep the humidity in your house low, then the likelihood of experiencing condensation is also low. However, the efficiency of your window will also impact the temperature and humidity level at which condensation occurs. Energy efficient windows will help reduce condensation. Here’s why – high performance windows with low U-factors result in inside glass surface temperatures much closer to the room air temperature. Windows with non-metal frames and more thermally-efficient spacers in the dual-pane glass units are also less likely to have condensation on the frame or at the edge of the glass.  Also, realize that in certain conditions (such as humid mornings after a clear night sky) some highly insulative windows may have dew on their outside surface. These windows are such good insulators, that dew is condensing there just like it does on an insulated wall.back to top